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Did Shakespeare really retire to Stratford?

Posted on April 08, 2016 by Connell Guides | 0 comments

Shakespeare's house in StratfordShakespeare abandoned London and retired to Stratford in about 1610. That’s what historians and Shakespeare experts have been telling us for 300 years. But is it true? Writing in theTimes Literary Supplement, the Shakespeare scholar Katherine Duncan-Jones suggests that it is not. In a dramatic overturning of received wisdom about the Bard, she supplies evidence that he may have remained in London long after 1610 – and didn’t retire to Stratford until shortly before he died. 

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Literary maps

Posted on April 07, 2016 by Connell Guides | 0 comments


Middle Earth MapIn his book Maps of the Imagination: The Writer as Cartographer, Peter Turchi argues that the relationship between literature and map-making has been unfairly overlooked, and that it may offer scholars a new lens for literary analysis.

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Nabokov's butterflies

Posted on April 06, 2016 by Connell Guides | 0 comments

Butterflies
Vladimir Nabokov is best known for
 Lolita, the novel that scandalised thousands of readers in the 1950s and 1960s. What is less well known, Mary Ellen Hannibal suggests in the journal Nautilus, is that Nabokov’s lifelong interest in butterflies had a strong influence both on the novelist in general and on his best-selling novel in particular.

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Three Hemingway letters

Posted on March 30, 2016 by Connell Guides | 0 comments

Ernest HemingwayAccording to The Independent article, 'The Letters of Ernest Hemingway, Volume 2, 1923-25, review' there are "6,000 or so of Ernest Hemingway's surviving letters, addressed to more than 1,900 recipients and running to nearly three million words" which would eventually fill at least 17 volumes.

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The origin of Mark Twain’s name

Posted on March 22, 2016 by Connell Guides | 0 comments

Before “Mark Twain” he was “Thomas Jefferson Snodgrass”. And before “Thomas Jefferson Snodgrass” he was “Sieur Louis de Conte”, “John Snook” and even “Josh”. Samuel Clemens, America’s classic satirist, used a litany of pseudonyms before settling on the name we know him by today. In the latest issue of the Mark Twain Journal Kevin MacDonnell reveals how and when Samuel Clemens decided conclusively to adopt Mark Twain as his pen name.

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Bestsellers that nearly weren’t 

Posted on March 18, 2016 by Connell Guides | 0 comments

Flavorwire identifies famous books originally rejected by publishers. Here are four:

 Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov 


 Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov  
Lolita is one of the best-selling novels of all time, with over 50 million copies sold since its debut in 1955. When Nabokov was trying to publish it, many publishers worried they would be tried for obscenity. One editor told Nabokov: “It is overwhelmingly nauseating, even to an enlightened Freudian. To the public, it will be revolting. It will not sell, and will do immeasurable harm to a growing reputation… I recommend that it be buried under a stone for a thousand years.”

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Writers' houses – in pictures

Posted on March 16, 2016 by Connell Guides | 0 comments

Jane Austen: Chawton House, Hampshire
If you’re interested in where great writers lived, take a look at Nick Channer's new book Where Great Books Began, which features more than 50 literary residences. A few appeared in the Guardian recently, complete with photographs: among them were John Keats's Hampstead villa, Jane Austen's red-brick house in Hampshire, Dylan Thomas's Carmarthenshire boathouse and Lord Byron's Newstead Abbey, where the debonair Romantic had a tame bear and wolf roaming the corridors — Byron inherited the sprawling property at the age of ten, and used its Great Hall for indoor pistol practice.

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